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March 31, 2015

Wayne State University Professor Gerald Feldman named president of American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics
Gerald Feldman, M.D., Ph.D., professor of Molecular Medicine and Genetics, Pathology, and Pediatrics for the Wayne State University School of Medicine, and medical director of the Division of Lab...

March 30, 2015

Wayne State offers matching funds for STEM internships
The Front Door for Business Engagement at Wayne State University is offering matching funds to small businesses in southeast Michigan to support student interns in the STEM fields. The Small Compa...

March 27, 2015

James Carr named Coleman A. Young Endowed Chair and professor of research in Wayne State's Department of Urban Studies and Planning
James Carr has been named the Coleman A. Young Endowed Chair and professor of research in Wayne State University’s Department of Urban Studies and Planning, effective August 2015. “We have l...

WSU In The News

National Geographic report highlights Wayne State research examining how brain-damaging mercury puts arctic kids at risk, Mar 29, 2015
In the frozen far north, in Arctic Quebec, the Inuit have relied on the same nutritious foods culled from the oceans for centuries: beluga whale, fish, seal, and walrus. But some of these traditional foods have become so contaminated with brain-damaging mercury that the IQs of schoolchildren in remote Arctic villages are abnormally low. Inuit kids with the highest exposures to mercury in the womb are four times more likely than less-exposed Inuit kids to have low IQs and require remedial education, according to new findings by a team of researchers in Canada and the United States. The IQs of 282 Nunavik children, ranging in age from 8 to 14 years, were compared with the amounts of mercury in their umbilical cord blood in the study conducted by researchers at Laval University in Quebec and Wayne State University. Study co-author Sandra Jacobson said the new Arctic Canada findings shift the evidence in favor of the connection between seafood and reduced mental ability in children. The study is the first to link prenatal mercury exposure to poor performance on an IQ test for schoolchildren. “One of the real values of our research is that it addresses some of those differences in a completely independent study population and helps to reduce the degree of controversy,” said Jacobson, a Wayne State University neuroscientist who has studied the effects of industrial chemicals on brain development for about 35 years. “Levels of PCBs have decreased over time. It’s probable that the Inuit children were exposed to a less neurotoxic mixture of chemicals than existed in the Great Lakes in the 1980s,” said Wayne State neuroscientist Joseph Jacobson, who co-authored the Nunavik and Lake Michigan studies with his wife, Sandra.
Master choreographer Garth Fagan honored by WSU, Mar 26, 2015
As a dancer, Garth Fagan has studied with some of the biggest names in the business: Martha Graham, Alvin Ailey, José Limón. The Wayne State University grad would add one influential person to that list — a WSU professor named Patricia Weller. Fagan said Weller balanced compliments with critiques without wounding the egos of young talent. Fagan, who has gone on to fame and accolades as a teacher, said he thinks about Weller's influence often. Weller and other college memories will be part of Fagan's presentation as he receives the Apple Award from WSU's Maggie Allesee Department of Theatre and Dance. The honor is part of "A Conversation with Apple Award Recipient Garth Fagan" on March 28 at the Berman Center for the Performing Arts in West Bloomfield. The Apple Award brings a nationally prominent theater professional to Detroit and the Wayne State campus as a guest lecturer to interact with and educate the Department of Theatre and Dance through master classes and a question-and-answer style forum. Previous Apple Award winners include Neil Simon, Carol Channing, Mandy Patinkin, Patti Lupone and Tom Skerritt. 'A Conversation with Apple Award Recipient Garth Fagan' will be held at 7 p.m. Saturday at The Berman Center for the Performing Arts in West Bloomfield.
WDET highlights CitizenDetroit "Dinner & Dialogue" events scheduled March 25, April 22, Mar 23, 2015
Many of the stories about Detroit are founded in myth and Citizen Detroit is using facts to find the real stories. Detroit exited bankruptcy with a plan to balance city budgets and improve services to residents. While elected leaders have the responsibility of overseeing those actions, residents can help measure improvements – or declines – in their neighborhoods. They’ll get help learning to do that at two free events presented by Citizen Detroit. "Dinner & Dialogues" are planned for 5 p.m., Wednesday March 25 and April 22 at the International Institute of Metropolitan Detroit. They are open forums where Detroiters can learn more about how the city’s post-bankruptcy “blueprint,” the Plan of Adjustment, was drafted and how it will be implemented, says Sheila Cockrel, former Detroit city councilwoman who is part of Citizen Detroit, a Wayne State University project aimed at educating and engaging the city’s residents in local government. “The idea was that regular Detroiters really want to understand the factual basis for the situations that the city was facing,” Cockrel says. “A hallmark of this program would be that we would deal in factual formation but also give people the opportunity to experience the complexity of making decisions.”
Slain civil rights activist to receive posthumous degree from Wayne State, Mar 22, 2015
Wayne State University plans to award Viola Gregg Liuzzo an honorary doctor of laws degree on April 10. It’s the first posthumous honorary degree in the 145-year-old school’s history. Liuzzo was fatally shot by Klansmen while shuttling demonstrators after the 1965 Selma-to-Montgomery voting rights march. Wayne State also will dedicate a tree or green space for Liuzzo. Kim Trent, a member of Wayne State's Board of Governors, initially broached the idea a decade ago as president of Wayne State's black alumni organization. The school declined, citing its policy of not awarding posthumous degrees, Trent said. "The truth of the matter is that Viola is worthy because she is deceased," Trent said. "She is a civil rights martyr. I understood there was something more important at stake." Trent was elected to the same board in 2012, and recently took another run at recognition for Liuzzo. They passed the recommendation in February. Liuzzo was a nursing student at Wayne State when she joined the civil rights movement. At the time of her death, the white, 39-year-old mother also was a member of Detroit's branch of the NAACP.

http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/2015/03/21/us/ap-us-civil-rights-activist-honor.html?_r=0
http://www.csmonitor.com/USA/2015/0321/Civil-rights-activist-shot-by-Klansman-will-receive-honorary-degree
http://www.mlive.com/news/detroit/index.ssf/2015/03/slain_civil_rights_activist_fr.html
http://mms.tveyes.com/Transcript.asp?StationID=1004&DateTime=3%2F22%2F2015+9%3A04%3A01+AM&LineNumber=&MediaStationID=1004&playclip=True&RefPage=
http://www.tuscaloosanews.com/article/20150322/NEWS/150329930/1007?Title=Civil-rights-activist-slain-in-Alabama-to-be-given-posthumous-degree
http://www.texarkanagazette.com/news/2015/03/22/civil-rights-activist-to-receive-posthum-368463.php
http://mms.tveyes.com/Transcript.asp?StationID=3975&DateTime=3%2F23%2F2015+6%3A38%3A47+AM&LineNumber=&MediaStationID=3975&playclip=True&RefPage=

Yahoo Finance: 3 reasons to attend ENGAGE 2015 International Investment Education Symposium, Mar 17, 2015
Students, professional investors and industry CEOs will come together on March 26 and 27 for ENGAGE 2015 International Investment Education Symposium. Scheduled to take place at Wayne State University, the conference is poised to be the can't-miss event of the year. It's the Largest event of Its kind, a professional event and students can show off their skills.
Model D: Tavis Smiley, late night king of PBS, to tape five episodes on WSU campus, Mar 16, 2015
Tavis Smiley, the king of late night television on PBS, is coming to Detroit on March 23, 24, and 25. Smiley, will tape five episodes of his show in front of live audiences at the Community Arts Auditorium on the campus of Wayne State University. Each episode will focus on the city and its rebirth, including examinations of the city’s Downtown resurgence, the challenges facing long-time residents of the city, the Arab American community in Dearborn, the arts community, and education. The week will conclude with a Detroit town hall meeting. Detroit Public Television will provide the crew and facilities to help produce the shows in conjunction with Wayne State University.
5700 Cass Avenue, 3100 Academic Administration Building * Detroit, Michigan 48202
Phone (313) 577-2150 * Fax (313) 577-4459 * Newsline (313) 577-5345